Planned Issues

 

The following issues of the world of music (new series) are forthcoming. Issue #1 of a given volume is scheduled to appear in June, issue #2 is scheduled to appear in December.

 

 

.:: the world of music (new series) Volume 8, Issue 1 (2019)
Dwelling in musical movement: Making a home in and through music


 

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.:: Content of the Forthcoming Issues

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.:: the world of music (new series) Volume 8, Issue 1 (2019)
Dwelling in musical movement: Making a home in and through music


Guest editor: Barbara Titus

 

Abstract
This special issue encompasses contributions about aural perspectives towards the experience, notion and conceptualization of home(-making). It explores how homes are built, made, imagined, remembered and (re)created through any form of sonic and aural activity (such as speaking, praying, singing, playing, hearing, dreaming sound/home). How do people physically, emotionally and psychologically find or create their space in an auditory chaos (LaBelle)? In what ways do sounds tune bodies to places (Feld) and what does such a nexus between the material and the social tell us about the relational positions in space and time that these bodies assume through temporary sensory experience? Such perspectives emphatically include modes of sonically, aurally or musically understanding or knowing processes of home-making. The Deleuzian interpretation of home as a positioned resonance between self and the world, or Lefebvre’s analyses of social atunements and inscriptions of rhythm or pulse as temporary (re)organizations of space are possible points of departure here.

All these perspectives towards home-making are supposed to foreground the relational, immersive, and performative implications of home-making as much as its located, representational and material ones. A focus on sound also enables the contributors to problematize the concept of home. Sound, after all, passes through human and non-human bodies and goes through (cultural) borders between home and the world. Thus the private and the public become part of each other in a decidedly unhomely condition (Bhabha). Sometimes such conditions are managed through mutually relational acts of renewed home-making, at other times through unidirectional and violent acts of domestication – patterned vibrations can colonize a milieu, and claim it as a territory of exclusivity or exile.

 

 

.:: Table of Contents

Dwelling in and through Music: Musical Modes of Being in the World
Birgit Abels

When the Listener Becomes a Walker. Remembering and Imagining on a Herdsman’s Mountain Path in the Karakoram Range, Pakistan
Thibault Fontanari

Dwelling through instruments: Gender, home and the Palestinian oud
Rachel Beckles Willson

Cracking the code: Sonic attunements on tour and on stage
Anna Lisa Ramella

 

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.:: Individual Paper Abstracts


Dwelling in and through Music: Musical Modes of Being in the World
Birgit Abels

In spite of significant advances in both the fields of music epistemology and the theory of knowledge, the mind–body dichotomy continues to have a substantial impact on the way human beings are imagined in the North Atlantic intellectual tradition: as subjects that form a “seat of awareness, bounded by the skin, and set over against the world” (Ingold [2000] 2011: 243). This, however, raises the fundamental problem of perception, usually referred to as the “mind–body problem”: How can anything ‘cross over’ from the outside to the inside, from the world to the mind? Or, the other way around, if the mind is immaterial and the world is material, how can the mind possibly carve out a home in the world? But musical experience crosses the boundaries of these taken-for-granted ontological categories. Resonating with both discursive and non-discursive frames, musicking (Small 1998) transcends the binaries of mind–body, inside–outside and immateriality–materiality by way of its experiential quality; at the same time, it relates to both parts of the presumed dichotomies. Thus, through musicking, an in-between space arises, where a specifically and intrinsically musical mode of human dwelling in the world exists (cf. Vadén and Torvinen 2014).
Recasting the role of musicking in making a home in the world, in this contribution I shall frame the dynamics of dwelling in and through music in terms of the experiential, the moving and the felt-bodily.


When the Listener Becomes a Walker. Remembering and Imagining on a Herdsman’s Mountain Path in the Karakoram Range, Pakistan
Thibault Fontanari

This article aims to discuss how the herdsmen of the Karakoram Range imagine and remember through walking and singing. Remembering is intimately related to their walk on the mountain paths towards the pastures. At the time of their construction, these paths are named after a deceased or an elder and become thereby prayer and remembrance places. The person for whom the path is built is sometimes praised in a song. These songs tell the story of a herdsman's journey and emphasize the exemplary actions he made such as facing a storm, leading a herd or crossing a cold river. The paper attempts to consider singing and walking as two related ways by which people remember the exemplary actions of a herdsman and by which they imagine their future in the world. As walking lead to remembering and imagining through the rhythm of the walk, singing lead to remembering and imagining by the rhythm of the song.  The walk and the song are two specific space-time though which people dwell in the world. Here we understand dwelling in the perspective drawn by Ingold as the way by which people are entangled with the others and the affordances of their surroundings in a direct perception. To achieve this goal, the article focus on the path of Muhammad made in the sixties and the song his son made in his honor, dedicating it to his nephew called by the name of his grandfather. First we will examine what people say about the construction of this pathway, second what they say about what they feel when they walk on it, and third how the song praising Muhammad invites the listener to become a walker.

 

Dwelling through instruments: Gender, home and the Palestinian oud
Rachel Beckles Willson

In this article I demonstrate that the assemblage created by an instrument and its player can function as a mechanism of musical home-making in both the intimate Deleuzian sense, and the public political sense of representing a homeland. I build on recent scholarship dedicated to the power of instruments, including the technics of performing bodies (De Souza 2017, Moseley 2015) and the agency of instruments in society (Bates 2012). I also draw on foundational work examining the gendering of musical practice with instruments (Doubleday 2008, Stobart 2008), and sensorial approaches to concepts of assemblage (Hamilakis 2014). My article will start with a theoretical discussion in which I address ways in which the assemblage of player-plus-instrument coheres as a home even as it crosses between private and public spheres and is subject to varying power regimes, creating, transforming and breaking affective territorial networks with its resonances.  I will also present a case study of the work of Palestinian musician Kamilya Jubran, who has unsettled numerous conventional expressions of both homeland and home in her work as composer, co-composer and oud player/vocalist in Europe since 2000. Today the oud is associated strongly with expressions of masculinity in the public sphere, as well as general notions of ‘the Arab nation’, and also the (apparently lost) homelands of Palestine and Iraq, more recently Syria. Through close-listening to Jubran’s compositions and analysis of a film about her work, I will argue that her assemblage embodies a counter-resonance, and offers a counter-narrative, in discussions about making or recovering ‘home’. ‘Home’, through the mediation of this female oud player, can be heard assimultaneously an intimate domestic space and a geopolitically-defined place, and also as an idea at the juncture of the colonial and the indigenous.


Cracking the code: Sonic attunements on tour and on stage
Anna Lisa Ramella

This article explores the significance of the musical performance and its sonic environment for musicians on the move as a process of attuning. Based on fieldwork on tour with rock bands, I will discuss practices of tuning instruments and sound-checking as well as the performance itself as constituents of dwelling and place-making on the move. Considering the notions of rhythm and pulse, the article will trace the eventual achievement of flow - a condition that has been referred to by the participants of my research as "cracking the code“. Dwelling in alternating environments challenges concepts of home or place, inscribing categories of stillness in the very experience of travel and movement. For most musicians, it is the musical performance that teaches them how to coexist in the tightly arranged space and time frames provided for them on tour - it is at the core of their practices in establishing familiarity and stability. In this article, I will particularly draw out how the sonic environment of practices that are connected to the performance – setting up, sound-checking, and eventually playing a show – build a familiar and homely atmosphere. I will do so by revisiting audio-visual material of the tour as well as extensive conversations with musicians on their experience of making music. The performance often serves as a reference for social, spatial and temporal situations on tour and attributes meaning to both place and travel. Traveling, then, becomes a search for a rhythm, similar to the experience of collectively composing a song. Ruptures appear as arhythmic elements of an overall, collective rhythmic endeavour within which the musicians unfold place- and sound-making practices that are routinized yet subject to constant attunement (Ingold/Vergunst 2008). I will consider the notions of rhythm and attunement as connecting elements between the experiences of music and movement.

 

 

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