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the world of music 40, 1998-3

Music and Music Research in Croatia


Guest Editor: Svanibor Pettan

ISSN 0043-8774
ISBN 3-86135-710-0

 

Content

 

Articles

Svanibor Pettan
Preface

Ennio Stipčević 
The Presence of the Past. The Earliest Musical Notations of Folk Music in Croatia

Naila Ceribašić 
Folklore Festivals in Croatia: Contemporary Controversies

Grozdana Marošević 
The Encounter Between Folklore Studies and Anthropology in Croatian Ethnomusicology

Tvrtko Zebec 
Glagolitic Priests as Leaders of Chain-Round Dances on the Island of Krk

Nikša Gligo 
Why Do We Like Symphonic Kolo? National Coloring and Its Articulation Through Folklore-based Idioms

Zdravko Blažecović
A Bibliography of Writings on Music and Music Research in Croatia Published in Languages Other Than Croatian 


Book Reviews (Jonathan Stock)

Deborah Wong, René T. A. Lysloff, Irén Kertész-Wilkinson,
Bernard Lortat-Jacob, Gregory F. Barz and Timothy J. Cooley

Review Symposium:  
Shadows in the Field: New Perspectives for Fieldwork in Ethnomusicology, ed. Gregory F. Barz and Timothy J. Cooley

Andreas Meyer
Chipedani und Mbira. Musikinstrumente, nichtbegriffliche Mathematik und die Evolution der harmonischen Progression in der Musik der Shona in Zimbabwe, Klaus Peter Brenner


CD Reviews (Janet Sturman)

Mark Forry
Croatia - Traditional Music of Today / Croatie - Musiques Traditionelles d'Ajoud'hui, Auvidis;
Croatie - Musique d'autrefois, Ocora


Institutions

Dieter Christensen
The Center for Ethnomusicology at Columbia University, New York, NY


About the Authors

 

Abstracts

The Presence of the Past: The Earliest Musical Notations of Folk Music in Croatia
Ennio Stipčević

The oldest musical notation of Croatian folk music dates from the mid-16th century. Already in the Renaissance diverse intentions regarding notation came to the fore: some wanted to record folk music as faithfully as possible, others wanted to intervene as authors. In the church, under the influence of the Reformation and latter the Counter-Reformation, tendencies emerged to single out the components of folk music that could be used for missionary and pastoral work. In the Baroque period transcriptions of Croatian folk music were no longer engrossed in the need for precision and faithfulness. The Enlightenment could no longer reconcile the principles of faithfulness with its own ideology. So even today the "myth of otherness” is sometimes still paradoxically and ahistorically present in attitudes toward the oldest notations of folk music and especially towards the folk history of "small nations” like Croatia.

Folklore Festivals in Croatia: Contemporary Controversies
Naila Ceribašić

This article outlines and discusses the main controversies surrounding the contemporary festivals of Croatia. It starts with the basic aesthetic concept of autochthony and its critique contained in the discussions on folklore and folklorism and considers the points of disagreement and agreement between the scholarly and expert discourses of Croatian ethnomusicology. Finally phenomena are indicated which hint at a new paradigm of the public practice of folk art. The author argues that concepts such as tradition, heritage, autochthony and authenticity cannot be explained as the remnants of the past in the present. These are contemporary concepts and practices that rest upon the idea of the remnants of the past in the present. Therefore, the central controversy of todayís Croatian folklore festivals lies not in what is being performed but who should be the permitted bearers and sanctioned connoisseurs of tradition.

The Encounter Between Folklore Studies and Anthropology in Croatian Ethnomusicology
Grozdana Marošević

The article provides an historical overview of the orientations and scopes of ethnomusicology in Croatia observed in the context of cultural, social and political circumstances. The central section of the article considers the creation of the so-called folkloristic paradigm of Croatian ethnomusicology, which was laid down in the mid-1970s under the influence of contextual (performative) folklore studies. Furthermore, the results of applying this paradigm to research during the 1980s is evaluated. The implementation and gradual expansion of an ethnomusicology conceived in terms of folklore studies by means of broadening its concept of music from strictly folklore to any kind of music is presented in reference to the most recent undertakings of ethnomusicologists in Croatia.

Glagolitic Priests as Leaders of Chain-Round Dances on the Island of Krk
Tvrtko Zebec

In this article, field research into dance events on the Island of Krk is augmented with the study of that island's history and identity, as well as the relations between the church and the people and social relations as a whole. The diachronic dimension of this research clearly reveals the reasons underlying the strict respect of the traditional social order among the population. The Glagolitic priests-their large numbers and high standing among the people-the ecclesiastical organisation of life, and the power of the church and its hierarchy have all played an important role in this social order. The island origins of the priests and the existing social norms did not hamper them from emphasising their standing and position in society through dance as a particularly powerful non-verbal means of communication, while at the same time meeting their individual needs to express their feeling through movement-and not merely through words delivered from the pulpit.

Why Do We Like Symphonic Kolo? National Coloring and Its Articulation Through Folklore-based Idioms)
Nikša Gligo

The main problem of adherents of the so-called "ideology of national orientation” is the relationship between the folkloristic and the artistic. In the piece entitled Symphonic Kolo, written during the height of that ideology, the composer Gotovac does not use quotations from folklore, and this article investigates how he tried to resolve the folklore-art relationship. Gotovac chose his material without any particular ethnomusicological interest, but simply according to his instinct. His compositional techniques comprise the processes of variation rather than of development. The elaboration of variational treatments are shown in some examples of his use of the basic cell, E-D-F-E-(D). This treatment also corresponds very well with endless transformations of the same in the kolo dance, as in the perpetually repetitive process of folk music. But the piece is, of course, not endless; the composer's artistic instinct interrupts this process at the right moment. This is evidently an artistic creation of folk-like material without an identifiable source.

A Bibliography of Writings on Music and Music Research in Croatia Published in Languages Other Than Croatian
Zdravko Blažeković

The present bibliographical selection aims to highlight easily available publications and to provide an introductory view to the music culture and music scholarship of Croatia. Although its focus is on works dealing with Croatian topics, it also lists a selection of works produced by Croatian scholars examining other topics as well. Summaries accompanying the bibliographic entries which, when read individually, give the basic idea of particular works and together provide a brief overview of music research in Croatia.
The bibliography is organized in six large categories, reflecting the classification used by RILM Abstracts of Music Literature, in which a large number of abstracts for publications issued in the 1980s and 1990s also originated. The categories are: 1) reference and research materials/state of music research; 2) general historical works; 3) works on individual musicians; 4) ethnomusicological works; 5) instruments; and 6) religious music.

Review Symposium:
Shadows in the Field: New Perspectives for Fieldwork in Ethnomusicology, ed. Gregory F. Barz and Timothy J. Cooley.

Deborah Wong; René T. Lysloff; Irén Kertész-Wilkinson;
Bernard Lortat-Jacob; Gregory F. Barz; Thimothy J. Cooley

The essays in Shadows in the Field address one of the key facets of ethnomusicological research, providing a stimulating set of reflections on fieldwork as experienced in a number of different settings. In reflection of the diversity of the book itself, a set of four responses has been commissioned. As will be apparent, responses involve a higher degree of personal reflection than standard reviews, and in place of the provision of a summary-evaluation of the book as a whole, each respondent has been encouraged to concentrate on only one or two fieldwork issues as developed inside or outside the pages of Shadows in the Field. Finally, the editors of the collection provide their own reflections upon the themes raised in these four responses.
The essays in Shadows in the Field are:
1. Casting Shadows in the Field: An Introduction, Timothy J. Cooley
2. (Un)doing Fieldwork: Sharing Songs, Sharing Lives, Michelle Kisliuk
3. Confronting the Filed(Note) In and Out of the Field: Music, Voices, Text, and Experiences in Dialogue, Gregory F. Barz
4. The Challenges of Human Relations in Ethnographic Inquiry: Examples from the Arctic and Subarctic Fieldwork, Nicole Beaudry
5. Knowing Fieldwork, Jeff Todd Titon
6. Toward a Mediation of Field Methods and Field Experience in Ethnomusicology, Timothy Rice
7. What's the Difference? Reflections on Gender and Research in Village India, Carol M. Babiracki
8. Fieldwork in the Ethnomusicological Past, Philip V. Bohlman
9. Selecting Partners: Questions of Personal Choice and Problems of History in Fieldwork and Its Interpretation, William Noll
10. The Ethnomusicologist, Ethnographic Method, and the Transmission of Tradition, Kay Kaufman Shelemay
11. Chasing Shadows in the Field: An Epilogue, Gregory F. Barz.

 

 

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