to the world of music archive

the world of music 39, 1997-3

volume with varied topics

ISBN 3-86135-706-2

 

Content

Articles

Preface

Barbara Rose Lange
Hungarian Rom (Gypsy) Political Activism and the Development of Folklór Ensemble Music

Alica Elscheková
Functions and Transformational Processes of Central European Wedding Songs

Janet Sturman
Movement Analysis as a Tool for Understanding Identity: Retentions, Borrowings, and Transformations in Native American Waila

Andreas Michel
Changes in Central European Concepts of Folk Musical Instruments: Industrially Produced Zithers Without Fingerboards

Yang Mu
On Musical Instruments of the Li Poeple of Hainan (China)


Book Reviews

Frank Kouwenhoven
Stock, Jonathan P. J. Musical Creativity in Twentieth-Century China. Abing, His Music and Its Changing Meanings

Max Peter Baumann
Lotz, Rainer E. Black People. Entertainers of African Descent in Europe, and Germany


CD Reviews

Ted Solís
Four Hindustani Instrumental CDs: A Review Essay


Institutions

Svanibor Pettan
Institute of Ethnology and Folklore Research (Zagreb, Croatia)


About the Authors

 

Abstracts

Hungarian Rom (Gypsy) Political Activism and the Development of Folklór Ensemble Music
Barbara Rose Lange

In socialist Hungary there were many negative conceptions on Rom (Gypsy) culture, exacerbated by a state policy of assimilation. Starting in the 1970s, Roma established folklór ensembles whose repertoire was based on rural family singing and dance. Folklór ensembles asserted artistic values for Rom music and served as a means of independent political development.

Functions and Transformational Processes of Central European Wedding Songs
Alica Elscheková

Wedding songs maintain traditional musical and poetic forms while also belonging to a permanent process of renewal and adaptation that has continued over centuries. The actual forms they take on in individual cultures, regions and ethnic areas are constructed in highly differentiated ways and depend on the current condition of the wedding tradition itself. Looking at the central European region, a gradient can be distinguished in the wedding song repertoire: in the direction of eastern Europe, it is more extensive, towards the west, the repertoire is considerably more limited. Functional differentiation determines the richness of wedding songs, which are also influenced by religious differences within the central European region.

Movement Analysis as a Tool for Understanding Identity: Retentions, Borrowings, and Transformations in Native American Waila
Janet Sturman

This article explores the role of body movement in defining musical style and group affiliation in situations in which music helps define identity. Two musical styles of popular dance music in the American Southwest, Native American waila and Mexican American norteño music, are compared and contrasted. These styles share roots and many performance practices but have developed to serve and represent different groups of people. Body movement, for performers as well as for the dancers who respond to the music, is one of the clues to meaningful differences between these styles. Attention to movement also offers insights into how waila musicians in particular are changing to reach wider constituencies. The author draws on several years of fieldwork, involving firsthand observation of musical performances and many interviews with participants, and on work by Bailey, Blacking, and Van Zile, among others, regarding movement analysis in musical performance.

Changes in Central European Concepts of Folk Musical Instrumets: Industrially Produced Zithers Without Fingerboards
Andreas Michel

Since about 1885 zithers without fingerboards have been distributed in Germany, the United States, Switzerland and other countries around the world by the musical instrument industry. Particularly until 1940, such zithers were sold in extraordinarily large numbers under the names of "guitar zither," "autoharp," "violin zither," "mandolinette zither," "pianochordia," etc.
These instruments, designed for the amateur musician who could not read notation, were to serve a new form of folk music and had a concept of distribution and reception that had been worked out on a commercial basis. This acted within the area between the contrasting poles of tranmitted middle-class forms of musical didactics and recent forms of folk music practice.

On Musical Instruments of the Li People of Hainan (China)
Yang Mu

With a population of more than one million, the Li are the only aboriginal people of Hainan Island, China. Being significant in military, economic, political and sociocultural aspects, this island and its people have been studied rather intensively. However, the musical culture of the Li remains a little studied subject. This article is an attempt to help fill this gap. It focuses on the indigenous musical instruments of the Li. I first depict the major types of instruments, then examine their traditional social and symbolic functions, and finally discuss an issue of identity in light of current changes involving these instruments and their functions. Since similar situations may also exist in other musical genres and geocultural regions of China and beyond, it is likely that the significance of this case study extends well beyond the fields of organology and Chinese music study, and that the findings reported here can contribute to related discussions in the fields of ethnomusicology, anthropology and cultural studies.

 

 

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